University of Southern Maine, Residence Hall

Gorham, Maine

  • FIRM

    Harriman

  • CLIENT

    University of Southern Maine

  • AREA

    101,000 sq.ft.

  • TOTAL COST

    $16,200,000.00

  • COMPLETION DATE

    8/2007

This four-story, 101,000-square-foot, 296-bed residence hall provides a variety of year-round living options for students, including single four-bedroom apartments and double-bedroom suites. Two apartments for the resident staff are situated on the ground floor at the end of each wing.

Circulation, both pedestrian and vehicular, as well as the internal circulation, ADDITIONAL INFORMATIONCAPACITY296COST PER SQ FT$160.00FEATURED IN2008 Architectural Portfolio the design concept. A west entrance from the student parking area and an upper east entrance both must flow into one central lobby control area. The challenging site, a former waste area on a steep slope and major corner of the campus, amplifies the form of the building. The concept is articulated through a five-story, slightly rotated tower at the corner of the site, which anchors the two residential wings.

Establishing the language and expression of the brick building with vertical metal siding is an interpretation of the campus’ existing 1950s architectural style. The high-tech modern architecture is predominant on the northwest end of the campus. The living room bay window in each suite adds relief and scale to the facade while articulating the residential character.

Daylight is brought into the building to foster creativity and interaction. A light-filled student lounge area adjacent to the lobby provides comfortable seating with windows on three sides. The west terrace is adjacent to the game room on the ground floor and provides an outdoor gathering and presentation area. State-of-the-art meeting rooms are adjacent to the lobby so that students have every tool available to enhance their academic experience.

Energy-efficient design of the mechanical and electrical systems; daylighting-conscious design; creative use of energy-management and monitoring systems; sun-control devices; and the use of building materials with recycled content all contribute to a LEED-gold registered building that respects the environment.