University of Dayton, Marianist Hall

Dayton, Ohio

  • FIRM

    Miller-Valentine Group

  • CLIENT

    University of Dayton

  • AREA

    156,157 sq.ft.

  • TOTAL COST

    $18,284,406.00

  • COMPLETION DATE

    8/2004

The University of Dayton (UD) is building 21st-century residential facilities that mix living and learning to accommodate a new generation of students.

Marianist Hall, named for the priests who founded the University of Dayton in 1859, is a multifunctional facility that will house 400 first- and second-year students, and includes campus ministry offices, a bookstore, ADDITIONAL INFORMATIONASSOCIATED FIRMEdge & Tinney Architects; Lotti Krishan & Short, Inc.CAPACITY396COST PER SQ FT$134.70FEATURED IN2004 Architectural PortfolioSUB CATEGORYWork in Progress office, food emporium, free-standing chapel and an integrated learning space where faculty and students will come together to collaborate on innovative curricula. The learning space in the new residence hall is part of the ongoing development of the university as a learning village. UD’s College of Arts & Sciences has played a central role in designing this space.

The student-housing component consists of three, four-story residential wings. The east and middle wings will house first-year students, co-ed by floor, in double-occupancy rooms. The west wing quad rooms will house sophomore students co-ed by quad. The two-story front commons area will have a first-floor main entrance and lobby, a food emporium, bookstore, administrative offices and worship area. The second floor of the commons area will house the credit union, post office, additional bookstore area, director’s office and learning center.

The University of Dayton began construction on the residence hall in May 2003. A fast-track project, it is slated to open in August 2004 on the northeast end of Founders Field.

“The University of Dayton is building for the future,” says Daniel J. Curran, president, who accelerated plans for the new residence hall and is spurring the renovation of older facilities. “We’re a strong academic institution, but we need to address where students live and learn. The new residence hall [is] starting the revitalization of our student housing. The new houses in the student neighborhood signal that we’re committed to maintaining the front-porch feel of the neighborhood that students love.”